PERSPECTIVES ON WASTE FROM THE SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES: OPENING THE BIN

@CambridgeScholarsPublishing @cambridgescholarsofficial @CamScholars 

Amid the uncertainty, though I hope today to bring on board some good news, and that is that new book with Cambridge Scholars, Perspectives On Waste From The Social Sciences And Humanities: Opening The Bin edited by Richard Ek and Nils Johansson is about to be published. I am delighted to be amidst contributing authors on the topic of waste, see the table of contents below. https://www.cambridgescholars.com/perspectives-on-waste-from-the-social-sciences-and-humanities| 2020-05-01

Waste is something we encounter on an everyday basis. Today, the waste-mountain is increasing despite ambitious measures being taken to decrease it. Consequently, increased scholarly interest is being devoted to waste, but primarily from a technocratic and scientific point of view. This compilation offers different perspectives on waste, its characteristics, and its presence in the world from social scientist and humanist standpoints. Waste is the constant companion to the human, and is thus inherent in modern society.

Therefore, waste needs to be further approached and understood from a plethora of scholarly perspectives and disciplines, and further investigated through a multitude of methodologies and data collection techniques. The imagination of a future where waste-preventive actions and circular economies permeate society can only be a reality if technocratic and scientific accounts of what is to be done, when, and how, are complemented by social scientific and humanist concepts of the nature and constitution of waste. Such a perspective offers the possibility to understand how waste is constituted through relationships, language, materials, politics, practices and structures. This book shows that philosophers, historians, cultural theorists and economists have much to offer on the topic of waste as a part of everyday modern life.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction: Opening the Bin to the Social Sciences and the
Humanities 3
Nils Johansson and Richard Ek

Chapter 1: Waste’s Social Order: A Historical Perspective 10
Anne Berg

Chapter 2: On Hauntology: A Turn To The Specter of Waste 24
Lisa Doeland

Chapter 3: Waste on Screen: Of Trashing, Littering and
Recycling in American TV-Series 41
Fanny Verrax

Chapter 4: Mending. Female Education in Waste Prevention
Over The Centuries 57
Heike Darwanz

Chapter 5: Moving Waste Around: Recycling and the
Governance of Waste Management 77
Myra J. Hird and Cassandra Kuyenhoven

Chapter 6: Waste, A Matter of Energy. A Diachronic
Analysis (1992-2017) of Waste-to-Energy Rationales 96
Laurence Rocher

Chapter 7: Environmental Concern in Waste Economy–A Case
Study of Waste Policy In Finnish Lapland 116
Veera Kinnunen, Heikki Huilaja,
Johanna Saariniemi and Jarno Valkonen

Chapter 8: Visualising the North Atlantic Gyre Patch 137
Katarina Dimitrijevic

Chapter 9: The Effect of Proximity on Waste Management
within the New Vision of Circular Economy in France 161
Jean-Baptiste Bahers and Mathieu Durand

Chapter 10:Waste-in-Becoming, Value-in-Waiting: On Market
Performativity and Value Propositions of Waste Electrical and
Electronic Equpment (WEEE) 176
Jennie Olofsson

Chapter 11: The Ocean as Thingspace. From The Ocean As
“Master of Disappearance” To The “Friendly Floatees” and a
New Ocean Cosmology 198
Petra Beck

Chapter 12: Designing For An Inclusive Waste Service:
Experiences from Applying Norm-Critical Design Methods
in Waste Service Development 215
Lisa Andersson, Marcus Jahnke,
Julia Jonasson and Rebecca Röström

Chapter 13: The Fashion Waste Management Process at ReTuna–
A Study of Unstable Classifications of Textile Goods 240
Lars Hedegård and Eva Gustafsson

Chapter 14: Apple’s Recycling Robot ‘Liam’ and the
Global Recycling Economy of E-Waste. What ‘The Guardian’
Does, And What He Misses Out On 265
Stefan Laser and Alison Stowell

List of Contributors 280

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